David’s Father

by Robert Munsch

Popular storyteller (and adoptive father) Robert Munsch knows how to spin a yarn using silly string, and this tale is no exception.

Julie meets David when he moves into the neighborhood and soon learns that because David was adopted, he is very different from his father. It’s not their skin color or features that set them apart. It’s the fact that David’s father is a giant. While David and Julie share cheeseburgers and milk shakes when she is invited over for dinner, David’s father enjoys heaping plates of snails, fried octopuses, and bricks covered in chocolate sauce.

If you are already familiar with Munsch’s stories, you know that they are perfect as read-alouds. In fact, he doesn’t write them until he’s told them numerous times, finding just the right words for maximum entertainment value. The colorful illustrations by Michael Martchenko are fun and add to the humor. 

Children love the absurdity in the story. Reading passages like this to my preschooler brought on fits of giggles:
They came to a road and they couldn’t get across. The cars would not stop for David. The cars would not stop for Julie. The father walked into the middle of the road, looked at the cars and yelled, “STOP.” 

The cars all jumped up into the air, ran around in a circle three times and went back up the street so fast they forgot their tires.

In comparison to a difference as big as the one in the book, real-life differences in many adoptive families can seem much more manageable.

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